Film Stars Being Objectified

By Brianna Sabrsula

The Roar (Leander, Texas)

Turn to any talk show, news channel, social media website or magazine and you will see something about a celebrity. This news is probably about their “social life” that they seem to know everything about or their recent movie that they starred in. A lot of the time these news segments can be about their weight or body.

Sometimes it’s to praise a recent dramatic weight loss – which isn’t really praising if they’re praising them for losing the weight so they could become thinner, and have a more acceptable body in Hollywood. Other times they are shaming them for things that regular people aren’t normally criticized for on such a broad scale. Most of the time they specifically target actresses.

“‘They were like, ‘No, we want you to be in the movie’”,  Amy Schumer said at her show at the Apollo, “‘we just need you to do three things. One: Just be yourself. Two: Have fun! And three: Stop eating food. I was like, ‘Wait a minute…don’t people need food to live?’ And they were like, ‘That’s a myth.’”

It can be easily made into a joke when Schumer puts it in those words, but she is stating a very real message about her industry. Other times, many actors can face rejection from producers and a casting crew if they are not a certain race or body type. Sometimes they are even rejected if they are not willing to act or speak like their races stereotype.

“If I do a show with two Indian dudes on the poster, everyone’s gonna think it’s an Indian show. It wouldn’t be relatable to a large mainstream audience”, a casting director said on the show ‘Master Of None’ that was created by Parks and Recreation star Aziz Ansari, who based the show on his road to fame.

Most film stars, particularly women, are constantly judged by their bodies, physical appearance, and the way they act in the public eye. It is 2016 and most female actresses are still commonly asked, “what is it like to be a woman in Hollywood?”.

“I’ve for many years tried to tell myself I wasn’t treated differently because I was a woman”, Anne Hathaway told the New York Times. “And I just thought maybe if I say these things they will be true. I wish they were, but they’re not.”

Photo Credit: Unsplash

About Grace Masback

Grace Masback, 17, aspires to give voice to the voiceless and holds the modest ambition of becoming the voice of Gen Z. Frustrated by the dearth of impactful platforms for teen journalists, she founded WANT, a news, sports, and entertainment website that aggregates the best in high school journalism from school newspapers and teen bloggers around the world (www.wantnewsforteens.com).

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