The Dreamer Dilemma

By Zach McGunagle

The Gaucho Gazette (Petaluma, California) 

 

Members of the DACA program, called Dreamers, have made an outcry against the administration. Protests in multiple large cities, from walkouts to blocking traffic, have led to many arrests and no change in Trump’s decision.

In June of 2012, the Obama administration issued an executive order on immigration called DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). This policy allowed minors that entered the country illegally (per their parents) to be given a two-year renewable permit, which granted them the ability to work and study in the U.S. without the fear of deportation.

Since it was passed, it has brought with it controversy, wherein some say that the program goes against the constitution since it never went through Congress. The Obama administration attempted to expand the program but failed to do so when numerous states sued against it.

Just recently on September 5th, attorney general Jeff Sessions announced that the DACA program was to be rescinded.

This move was promised by Trump early on during the election, and he planned to cut the program immediately after he took office. Although this decision was delayed, the cut seemed inevitable, considering the standpoint that Trump takes on immigration and the other programs he already cut.

The members of the DACA program, called Dreamers, have made an outcry against the administration. Protests in multiple large cities, from walkouts to blocking traffic, have led to many arrests and no change in Trump’s decision. However, he has come out on twitter stating that no action will be taken on the Dreamers during the transition period for the program. The administration decided to give six months for Congress to reinstate the program legally, without executive order like the Obama administration did.

There is still hope for the program, although many changes will be made. One possible outcome after the six month period would be Congress passing the DREAM Act. This act brought to Congress multiple times since 2001 but failed to pass.

If the act manages to get through Congress, it would allow for the Dreamers to work their way to permanent residency legally.

Photo Credit: The Gaucho Gazette

Leave a Reply